Disruption of endothelial Pfkfb3 ameliorates diet-induced murine insulin resistance

in Journal of Endocrinology
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  • 1 Q Yang, Vascular Biology Center, Augusta University, Augusta, United States
  • 2 J Xu, Vascular Biology Center, Augusta University, Augusta, United States
  • 3 Q Ma, Vascular Biology Center, Augusta University Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, United States
  • 4 Z Liu, Vascular Biology Center, Augusta University, Augusta, United States
  • 5 Y Zhou, State Key Laboratory of Chemical Oncogenomics, Key Laboratory of Chemical Genomics, Peking University Shenzhen Graduate School, Shenzhen, China
  • 6 Y Cai, State Key Laboratory of Chemical Oncogenomics, Key Laboratory of Chemical Genomics, Peking University Shenzhen Graduate School, Shenzhen, China
  • 7 X Mao, Vascular Biology Center, Augusta University, Augusta, United States
  • 8 D Stepp, Vascular Biology Center, Augusta University, Augusta, United States
  • 9 N Weintraub, Vascular Biology Center, Augusta University, Augusta, United States
  • 10 D Fulton, Vascular Biology Center, Augusta University, Augusta, United States
  • 11 M Hong, State Key Laboratory of Chemical Oncogenomics, Key Laboratory of Chemical Genomics, Peking University Shenzhen Graduate School, Shenzhen, China
  • 12 Y Huo, Vascular Biology Center, Department of Cellular Biology and Anatomy, Augusta University, Augusta, United States

Correspondence: Yuqing Huo, Email: YHUO@augusta.edu
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Overnutrition-induced endothelial inflammation plays a crucial role in high fat diet (HFD)-induced insulin resistance in animals. Endothelial glycolysis plays a critical role in endothelial inflammation and proliferation, but its role in diet-induced endothelial inflammation and subsequent insulin resistance has not been elucidated. PFKFB3 is a critical glycolytic regulator, and its increased expression has been observed in adipose vascular endothelium of C57BL/6J mice fed with HFD in vivo, and in palmitate (PA)-treated primary human adipose microvascular endothelial cells (HAMECs) in vitro. We generated mice with Pfkfb3 deficiency selective for endothelial cells to examine the effect of endothelial Pfkfb3 in endothelial inflammation in metabolic organs and in the development of HFD-induced insulin resistance. EC Pfkfb3-deficient mice exhibited mitigated HFD-induced insulin resistance, including decreased body weight and fat mass, improved glucose clearance and insulin sensitivity, and alleviated adiposity and hepatic steatosis. Mechanistically, cultured PFKFB3 knockdown HAMECs showed decreased NF-κB activation induced by PA, and consequent suppressed adhesion molecule expression and monocyte adhesion. Taken together, these results demonstrate that increased endothelial PFKFB3 expression promotes diet-induced inflammatory responses and subsequent insulin resistance, suggesting that endothelial metabolic alteration plays an important role in the development of insulin resistance.

 

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