Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 14,561 items for

Full access

Dieuwertje C E Spaanderman, Mark Nixon, Jacobus C Buurstede, Hetty H C M Sips, Maaike Schilperoort, Eline N Kuipers, Emma A Backer, Sander Kooijman, Patrick C N Rensen, Natalie Z M Homer, Brian R Walker, Onno C Meijer and Jan Kroon

Glucocorticoid signaling is context dependent, and in certain scenarios, glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) are able to engage with other members of the nuclear receptor subfamily. Glucocorticoid signaling can exert sexually dimorphic effects, suggesting a possible interaction with androgen sex hormones. We therefore set out to determine the crosstalk between glucocorticoids and androgens in metabolic tissues including white adipose tissue, liver and brown adipose tissue. Thereto we exposed male C57BL/6J mice to elevated levels of corticosterone in combination with an androgen receptor (AR) agonist or an AR antagonist. Systemic and local glucocorticoid levels were determined by mass spectrometry, and tissue expression of glucocorticoid-responsive genes and protein was measured by RT-qPCR and Western blot, respectively. To evaluate crosstalk in vitro, cultured white and brown adipocytes were exposed to a combination of corticosterone and an AR agonist. We found that AR agonism potentiated transcriptional response to GR in vitro in white and brown adipocytes and in vivo in white and brown adipose tissues. Conversely, AR antagonism substantially attenuated glucocorticoid signaling in white adipose tissue and liver. In white adipose tissue, this effect could partially be attributed to decreased 11B-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1-mediated glucocorticoid regeneration upon AR antagonism. In liver, attenuated GR activity was independent of active glucocorticoid ligand levels. We conclude that androgen signaling modulates GR transcriptional output in a tissue-specific manner.

Full access

Achim Lother, Lisa Deng, Michael Huck, David Fürst, Jessica Kowalski, Jennifer S Esser, Martin Moser, Christoph Bode and Lutz Hein

Aldosterone is a key factor in adverse cardiovascular remodeling by acting on the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in different cell types. Endothelial MR activation mediates hypertrophy, inflammation and fibrosis. Cardiovascular remodeling is often accompanied by impaired angiogenesis, which is a risk factor for the development of heart failure. In this study, we evaluated the impact of MR in endothelial cells on angiogenesis. Deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-induced hypertension was associated with capillary rarefaction in the heart of WT mice but not of mice with cell type-specific MR deletion in endothelial cells. Consistently, endothelial MR deletion prevented the inhibitory effect of aldosterone on the capillarization of subcutaneously implanted silicon tubes and on capillary sprouting from aortic ring segments. We examined MR-dependent gene expression in cultured endothelial cells by RNA-seq and identified a cluster of differentially regulated genes related to angiogenesis. We found opposing effects on gene expression when comparing activation of the mineralocorticoid receptor in ECs to treatment with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a potent activator of angiogenesis. In conclusion, we demonstrate here that activation of endothelial cell MR impaired angiogenic capacity and lead to capillary rarefaction in a mouse model of MR-driven hypertension. MR activation opposed VEGF-induced gene expression leading to the dysregulation of angiogenesis-related gene networks in endothelial cells. Our findings underscore the pivotal role of endothelial cell MR in the pathophysiology of hypertension and related heart disease.

Full access

Viktorija Gustaityte, Martina Winkler, Ines Stölting and Walter Raasch

Based on findings that treatment with AT1 receptor blocker (ARB) prevents diet-induced obesity and that the activity of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis is stimulated by AngII and blocked by ARBs, we aimed to investigate whether ARB treatment can reduce stress-induced eating of cafeteria diet (CD), thus contributing to alterations in eating behavior. Sprague–Dawley rats were fed with chow or CD and treated with telmisartan (TEL, 8 mg/kg/day) or vehicle. At weeks 2 and 12, rats were stressed over five consecutive days by restraint stress (RS, 4 h) and by additional shaking at d5. Tail blood was sampled during RS to determine hormone levels. During the first period of RS, ACTH and corticosterone responses were diminished at d5 in CD- compared to chow-fed rats. Independently of feeding, TEL did not reduce stress hormones. Compared to food behavior before RS, the stress-induced CD eating increased in controls but remained unchanged in TEL-treated rats. After 12 weeks, TEL reduced weight gain and energy intake, particularly in CD-fed rats. Similar to the first RS period, corticosterone response was reduced in CD-fed rats at d5 during the second RS period. TEL did not further reduce stress hormones and did not lessen the CD eating upon RS. We conclude that CD feeding compensates for stress reactions. However, stress-induced CD eating was only reduced by TEL after short term, but not after long-term drug treatment. Thus, the potency of ARBs to lower HPA activity only plays a minor role in reducing energy intake to prevent obesity.

Full access

Christopher J Scott, Jessica L Rose, Allan J Gunn and Briony M McGrath

The control of reproductive processes involves the integration of a number of factors from the internal and external environment, with the final output signal of these processes being the pulsatile secretion of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) from the hypothalamus. These factors include the feedback actions of sex steroids, feed intake and nutritional status, season/photoperiod, pheromones, age and stress. Understanding these factors and how they influence GnRH secretion and hence reproduction is important for the management of farm animals. There is evidence that the RF-amide neuropeptide, kisspeptin, may be involved in relaying the effects of these factors to the GnRH neurons. This paper will review the evidence from the common domestic animals (sheep, goats, cattle, horses and pigs), that kisspeptin neurons are (i) regulated by the factors listed above, (ii) contact GnRH neurons and (iii) involved in the regulation of GnRH/gonadotrophin secretion.

Full access

Zerui Wu, Lin Cai, Jianglong Lu, Chengde Wang, Jiaqing Guan, Xianbin Chen, Jinsen Wu, Weiming Zheng, Zhebao Wu, Qun Li and Zhipeng Su

To date, the management of dopamine agonist (DA)-resistant prolactinomas remains a major clinical problem. Previously, we determined that miRNA-93 expression increases in DA-resistant prolactinomas; however, the role of miRNA-93 in the DA resistance remains largely unexplored. Hence, this study aimed to investigate the susceptibility of tumor cells to cabergoline (CAB) and the autophagy changes in MMQ and GH3 cells after miRNA-93 overexpression or inhibition. We used bioinformatics to identify the potential target of miRNA-93. Subsequently, we analyzed the correlation between miRNA-93 and autophagy-related 7 (ATG7) using protein expression analysis and luciferase assays. Furthermore, the change in the effect of miRNA-93 was measured after ATG7 overexpression. miRNA-93 expression was elevated in DA-resistant prolactinomas, whereas the expression of its identified target, ATG7, was downregulated. miRNA-93 overexpression suppressed the cytotoxic effect of CAB in MMQ and GH3 cells. In contrast, miRNA-93 downregulation enhanced CAB efficiency and promoted cell autophagy, eventually resulting in apoptosis. These results were further confirmed in in vivo xenograft models in nude mice. ATG7 overexpression could reverse the inhibitory effect of miRNA-93 on CAB treatment. Taken together, our results suggest that miRNA-93 mediates CAB resistance via autophagy downregulation by targeting ATG7 and serves as a promising therapeutic target for prolactinoma.

Open access

K E Lines, P J Newey, C J Yates, M Stevenson, R Dyar, G V Walls, M R Bowl and R V Thakker

Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterised by the combined occurrence of parathyroid, pituitary and pancreatic islet tumours, and is due to mutations of the MEN1 gene, which encodes the tumour suppressor protein menin. Menin has multiple roles in genome stability, transcription, cell division and proliferation, but its mechanistic roles in tumourigenesis remain to be fully elucidated. miRNAs are non-coding single-stranded RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression and have been associated with tumour development, although the contribution of miRNAs to MEN1-associated tumourigenesis and their relationship with menin expression are not fully understood. Alterations in miRNA expression, including downregulation of three putative ‘tumour suppressor’ miRNAs, miR-15a, miR-16-1 and let-7a, have been reported in several tumour types including non-MEN1 pituitary adenomas. We have therefore investigated the expression of miR-15a, miR-16-1 and let-7a in pituitary tumours that developed after 12 months of age in female mice with heterozygous knockout of the Men1 gene (Men1 +/ mice). The miRNAs miR-15a, miR-16-1 and let-7a were significantly downregulated in pituitary tumours (by 2.3-fold, P < 0.05; 2.1-fold P < 0.01 and 1.6-fold P < 0.05, respectively) of Men1 +/ mice, compared to normal WT pituitaries. miR-15a and miR-16-1 expression inversely correlated with expression of cyclin D1, a known pro-tumourigenic target of these miRNAs, and knockdown of menin in a human cancer cell line (HeLa), and AtT20 mouse pituitary cell line resulted in significantly decreased expression of miR-15a (P < 0.05), indicating that the decrease in miR-15a may be a direct result of lost menin expression.

Open access

Lesley A Hill, Dimitra A Vassiliadi, Ioanna Dimopoulou, Anna J Anderson, Luke D Boyle, Alixe H M Kilgour, Roland H Stimson, Yoan Machado, Christopher M Overall, Brian R Walker, John G Lewis and Geoffrey L Hammond

Corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) transports glucocorticoids in blood and is a serine protease inhibitor family member. Human CBG has a reactive center loop (RCL) which, when cleaved by neutrophil elastase (NE), disrupts its steroid-binding activity. Measurements of CBG levels are typically based on steroid-binding capacity or immunoassays. Discrepancies in ELISAs using monoclonal antibodies that discriminate between intact vs RCL-cleaved CBG have been interpreted as evidence that CBG with a cleaved RCL and low affinity for cortisol exists in the circulation. We examined the biochemical properties of plasma CBG in samples with discordant ELISA measurements and sought to identify RCL-cleaved CBG in human blood samples. Plasma CBG-binding capacity and ELISA values were consistent in arterial and venous blood draining skeletal muscle, liver and brain, as well as from a tissue (adipose) expected to contain activated neutrophils in obese individuals. Moreover, RCL-cleaved CBG was undetectable in plasma from critically ill patients, irrespective of whether their ELISA measurements were concordant or discordant. We found no evidence of RCL-cleaved CBG in plasma using a heat-dependent polymerization assay, and CBG that resists immunoprecipitation with a monoclonal antibody designed to specifically recognize an intact RCL, bound steroids with a high affinity. In addition, mass spectrometry confirmed the absence of NE-cleaved CBG in plasma in which ELISA values were highly discordant. Human CBG with a NE-cleaved RCL and low affinity for steroids is absent in blood samples, and CBG ELISA discrepancies likely reflect structural differences that alter epitopes recognized by specific monoclonal antibodies.

Open access

Vikte Lionikaite, Karin L Gustafsson, Anna Westerlund, Sara H Windahl, Antti Koskela, Juha Tuukkanen, Helena Johansson, Claes Ohlsson, H Herschel Conaway, Petra Henning and Ulf H Lerner

Excess vitamin A has been associated with decreased cortical bone thickness and increased fracture risk. While most studies in rodents have employed high dosages of vitamin A for short periods of time, we investigated the bone phenotype in mice after longer exposure to more clinically relevant doses. For 1, 4 and 10 weeks, mice were fed a control diet (4.5 µg retinyl acetate/g chow), a diet modeled from the human upper tolerable limit (UTL; 20 µg retinyl acetate/g chow) and a diet three times UTL (supplemented; 60 µg retinyl acetate/g chow). Time-dependent decreases in periosteal circumference and bone mineral content were noted with the supplemented dose. These reductions in cortical bone resulted in a significant time-dependent decrease of predicted strength and a non-significant trend toward reduced bone strength as analyzed by three-point bending. Trabecular bone in tibiae and vertebrae remained unaffected when vitamin A was increased in the diet. Dynamic histomorphometry demonstrated that bone formation was substantially decreased after 1 week of treatment at the periosteal site with the supplemental dose. Increasing amount of vitamin A decreased endocortical circumference, resulting in decreased marrow area, a response associated with enhanced endocortical bone formation. In the presence of bisphosphonate, vitamin A had no effect on cortical bone, suggesting that osteoclasts are important, even if effects on bone resorption were not detected by osteoclast counting, genes in cortical bone or analysis of serum TRAP5b and CTX. In conclusion, our results indicate that even clinically relevant doses of vitamin A have a negative impact on the amount of cortical bone.

Full access

Rumana Yasmeen, Qiwen Shen, Aejin Lee, Jacob H Leung, Devan Kowdley, David J DiSilvestro, Lu Xu, Kefeng Yang, Andrei Maiseyeu, Naresh C Bal, Muthu Periasamy, Paolo Fadda and Ouliana Ziouzenkova

Adipokine leptin regulates neuroendocrine circuits that control energy expenditure, thermogenesis and weight loss. However, canonic regulators of leptin secretion, such as insulin and malonyl CoA, do not support these processes. We hypothesize that epiregulin (EREG), a growth factor that is secreted from fibroblasts under thermogenic and cachexia conditions, induces leptin secretion associated with energy dissipation. The effects of EREG on leptin secretion were studied ex vivo, in the intra-abdominal white adipose tissue (iAb WAT) explants, as well as in vivo, in WT mice with diet-induced obesity (DIO) and in ob/ob mice. These mice were pair fed a high-fat diet and treated with intraperitoneal injections of EREG. EREG increased leptin production and secretion in a dose-dependent manner in iAb fat explants via the EGFR/MAPK pathway. After 2 weeks, the plasma leptin concentration was increased by 215% in the EREG-treated group compared to the control DIO group. EREG-treated DIO mice had an increased metabolic rate and core temperature during the active dark cycle and displayed cold-induced thermogenesis. EREG treatment reduced iAb fat mass, the major site of leptin protein production and secretion, but did not reduce the mass of the other fat depots. In the iAb fat, expression of genes supporting mitochondrial oxidation and thermogenesis was increased in EREG-treated mice vs control DIO mice. All metabolic and gene regulation effects of EREG treatment were abolished in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice. Our data revealed a new role of EREG in induction of leptin secretion leading to the energy expenditure state. EREG could be a potential target protein to regulate hypo- and hyperleptinemia, underlying metabolic and immune diseases.

Full access

Diego Safian, Najoua Ryane, Jan Bogerd and Rüdiger W Schulz

Follicle-stimulating hormone (Fsh) modulates vertebrate spermatogenesis by regulating somatic cell functions in the testis. We have found previously that zebrafish Fsh stimulated the differentiating proliferation of type A undifferentiated spermatogonia (Aund) in an androgen-independent manner by regulating the production of growth factors and other signaling molecules in both Sertoli (SCs) and Leydig cells (LCs). For example, Fsh triggered the release of Igf3 that subsequently activated β-catenin signaling to promote the differentiating proliferation of Aund. In the present study, we report that Fsh moreover uses the non-canonical Wnt pathway to promote the proliferation and accumulation of Aund. Initially, we found that the stimulatory effect of Fsh on the proliferation activity of Aund was further strengthened when β-catenin signaling was inhibited, resulting in an accumulation of Aund. We then showed that this Fsh-induced accumulation of Aund was associated with increased transcript levels of the non-canonical Wnt ligand, wnt5a. In situ hybridization of insl3 mRNA, a gene expressed in LCs, combined with Wnt5a immunocytochemistry identified LCs as the cellular source of Wnt5a in the adult zebrafish testis. Addition of an antagonist of Wnt5a to incubations with Fsh decreased both the proliferation activity and the relative section area occupied by Aund, while an agonist of Wnt5a increased these same parameters for Aund. Taken together, our data suggest that Fsh triggered LCs to release Wnt5a, which then promoted the proliferation and accumulation of Aund. Hence, Fsh uses non-canonical Wnt signaling to ensure the production of Aund, while also triggering β-catenin signaling via Igf3 to ensure spermatogonial differentiation.