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Alvaro Souto Padron, Ruy Andrade Louzada Neto, Thiago Urgal Pantaleão, Maria Carolina de Souza dos Santos, Renata Lopes Araujo, Bruno Moulin de Andrade, Monique da Silva Leandro, João Pedro Saar Werneck de Castro, Andrea Claudia Freitas Ferreira and Denise Pires de Carvalho

as TSH secretion from rat pituitary fragments, and it was also able to decrease the TSH levels of hypothyroid rats ( Moreno et al . 1998 ). Moreover, 3,5-T2 increases pituitary type 1 iodothyronine deiodinase (D1) activity and transiently decreases

Open access

Shona Wood and Andrew Loudon

mammals, GPR50 expression in the brain is concentrated in circum-ventricular hypothalamic areas, adjacent to or overlapping with photoperiodic deiodinase enzyme regulation, and here, it is under strong photoperiodic regulation ( Barrett et al . 2006

Open access

Joachim M Weitzel, Torsten Viergutz, Dirk Albrecht, Rupert Bruckmaier, Marion Schmicke, Armin Tuchscherer, Franziska Koch and Björn Kuhla

regulatory mechanisms, the ligand itself can be modified e.g. via the action of deiodinases ( Piehl et al. 2011 , Gereben et al. 2015 ). The combined action of THR together with its ligand regulates a wide variety of TH target genes via TH response

Open access

Shiao Y Chan, Laura A Hancox, Azucena Martín-Santos, Laurence S Loubière, Merlin N M Walter, Ana-Maria González, Phillip M Cox, Ann Logan, Christopher J McCabe, Jayne A Franklyn and Mark D Kilby

-restricted fetal guinea pigs has shown a compensatory increase in brain deiodinase type 2 (DIO2) expression, which could increase local concentrations of the active thyroid hormone (TH) ligand, T 3 , from T 4 conversion ( Chan et al . 2005 ). In clinical practice

Open access

Bernard Freudenthal, John Logan, Sanger Institute Mouse Pipelines, Peter I Croucher, Graham R Williams and J H Duncan Bassett

iodothyronine deiodinase in osteoblasts . PNAS 107 7604 – 7609 . ( doi:10.1073/pnas.0911346107 ) Bassett JH Gogakos A White JK Evans H Jacques RM van der Spek AH Ramirez-Solis R Ryder E Sunter D Boyde A 2012a

Open access

Nadia Schoenmakers, Kyriaki S Alatzoglou, V Krishna Chatterjee and Mehul T Dattani

). In the hypothalamus, thyroid hormone is taken up into the brain from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the 3rd ventricle or from blood vessels in the median eminence by deiodinase type 2 (DIO2)-expressing tanycytes or astrocytes respectively. DIO2