Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author: Wenjun Zhou x
  • User-accessible content x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

Li Li, Xiaohua Li, Wenjun Zhou and Joseph L Messina

In recent years, the roles of chronic stress and depression as independent risk factors for decreased insulin sensitivity and the development of diabetes have been increasingly recognized. However, an understanding of the mechanisms linking insulin resistance and acute psychological stress are very limited. We hypothesized that acute psychological stress may cause the development of insulin resistance, which may be a risk factor in developing type 2 diabetes. We tested the hypothesis in a well-established mouse model using 180 episodes of inescapable foot shock (IES) followed by a behavioral escape test. In this study, mice that received IES treatment were tested for acute insulin resistance by measuring glucose metabolism and insulin signaling. When compared with normal and sham mice, mice that were exposed to IES resulting in escape failure (defined as IES with behavioral escape failure) displayed elevated blood glucose levels in both glucose tolerance and insulin tolerance tests. Furthermore, mice with IES exposure and behavioral escape failure exhibited impaired hepatic insulin signaling via the insulin-induced insulin receptor/insulin receptor substrate 1/Akt pathway, without affecting similar pathways in skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, and brain. Additionally, a rise in the murine growth-related oncogene KC/GRO was associated with impaired glucose metabolism in IES mice, suggesting a mechanism by which psychological stress by IES may influence glucose metabolism. The present results indicate that psychological stress induced by IES can acutely alter hepatic responsiveness to insulin and affect whole-body glucose metabolism.

Free access

You-Hua Xu, Chen-Lin Gao, Heng-Li Guo, Wen-Qian Zhang, Wei Huang, Shan-Shan Tang, Wen-Jun Gan, Yong Xu, Hua Zhou and Quan Zhu

Endotoxemia has been recognized to be closely accompanied with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and is responsible for many diabetic complications. Recent study suggests the potential role of butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) from microbiota metabolite, on T2DM. Gut-leak is a key event in diabetic-endotoxemia. To investigate if butyrate could ameliorate diabetic-endotoxemia, both in vivo and in vitro experiments were carried out in the present study. The effect of butyrate supplementation on blood HbA1c and inflammatory cytokines were determined in db/db mice; gut barrier integrity and expression of tight junction proteins were investigated both in vivo and in vitro. Oral butyrate administration significantly decreased blood HbA1c, inflammatory cytokines and LPS in db/db mice; inflammatory cell infiltration was reduced, and gut integrity and intercellular adhesion molecules were increased as detected by HE staining, immunohistochemistry and Western blot. By gut microbiota assay, ratio of Firmicutes:Bacteroidetes for gut microbiota was reduced by butyrate. In Caco-2 cells, butyrate significantly promoted cell proliferation, decreased inflammatory cytokines’ secretion, enhanced cell anti-oxidative stress ability and preserved the epithelial monocellular integrity, which was damaged by LPS. The present findings demonstrated that butyrate supplementation could ameliorate diabetic-endotoxemia in db/db mice via restoring composition of gut microbiota and preserving gut epithelial barrier integrity.