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Rhonda D Prisby, Joshua M Swift, Susan A Bloomfield, Harry A Hogan, and Michael D Delp

Osteopenia and an enhanced risk of fracture often accompany type 1 diabetes. However, the association between type 2 diabetes and bone mass has been ambiguous with reports of enhanced, reduced, or similar bone mineral densities (BMDs) when compared with healthy individuals. Recently, studies have also associated type 2 diabetes with increased fracture risk even in the presence of higher BMDs. To determine the temporal relationship between type 2 diabetes and bone remodeling structural and mechanical properties at various bone sites were analyzed during pre-diabetes (7 weeks), short-term (13 weeks), and long-term (20 weeks) type 2 diabetes. BMDs and bone strength were measured in the femora and tibiae of Zucker diabetic fatty rats, a model of human type 2 diabetes. Increased BMDs (9–10%) were observed in the distal femora, proximal tibiae, and tibial mid- shafts in the pre-diabetic condition that corresponded with higher plasma insulin levels. During short- and long-term type 2 diabetes, various parameters of bone strength and BMDs were lower (9–26%) in the femoral neck, distal femora, proximal tibiae, and femoral and tibial mid-shafts. Correspondingly, blood glucose levels increased by 125% and 153% during short- and long-term diabetes respectively. These data indicate that alterations in BMDs and bone mechanical properties are closely associated with the onset of hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia, which may have direct adverse effects on skeletal tissue. Consequently, disparities in the human literature regarding the effects of type 2 diabetes on skeletal properties may be associated with the bone sites studied and the severity or duration of the disease in the patient population studied.

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T Tsushima, M Arai, O Isozaki, Y Nozoe, K Shizume, H Murakami, N Emoto, M Miyakawa, and H Demura

Abstract

Although endothelins were originally discovered as peptides with vasoconstrictor activity, recent studies have indicated a number of endothelin (ET)-induced hormonal functions in various tissues. We have studied the interaction of endothelins with porcine thyroid cells in culture. Specific binding of 125I-labelled ET-1 was demonstrated in porcine thyroid cells. The binding was displaced equally by unlabelled ET-1 and ET-2, but receptor affinity for ET-3 was lower than that for ET-1 and -2. Scatchard analysis of the data revealed a single class of high-affinity ET-1 receptors with a K d of 0·45 nmol/l and a binding capacity of 2100 sites/cell. SDS-PAGE and autoradiography of 125I-labelled ET-1 cross-linked with thyroid cell membranes demonstrated ET-1 binding sites with an apparent molecular weight of 50 kDa. These results indicated that ET-1 receptors in thyroid cells are type A ET receptors. In association with the presence of ET-1 receptors, porcine thyroid cells responded to ET-1 and ET-2 with an increase in c-fos mRNA expression. Although ET-1 did not affect DNA synthesis stimulated by either EGF or IGF-I, it dose-dependently inhibited TSH-induced iodide uptake and also inhibited iodide uptake stimulated by forskolin and 8-bromo-cAMP. ET-1 had no effect on TSH-stimulated cAMP production. Thus, ET-1 inhibited TSH-induced iodine metabolism by acting at the steps distal to cAMP production. In agreement with a recent report, immunoreactive ET-1 was detected in medium conditioned by porcine thyroid cells. Antibody to ET-1 was found to increase TSH-induced iodide uptake. These results are compatible with the notion that ET-1 negatively regulates TSH-induced iodide uptake in an autocrine manner.

Journal of Endocrinology (1994) 142, 463–470

Free access

Christian K Tipsmark and Steffen S Madsen

It has recently become evident that maintenance of ionic homoeostasis in euryhaline salmonids involves a reciprocal shift in expression of two isoforms of the gill Na+,K+-atpase α-subunit when the surrounding salinity changes. The present study investigated the regulation of this shift between the α1a (freshwater (FW) isoform) and the α1b (seawater (SW) isoform) by cortisol, Gh, prolactin (Prl) and Igf 1. Injection with cortisol into FW salmon increased α1a expression, while Gh had no effect. Conversely, both cortisol and Gh stimulated α1b expression, and a significant synergy was observed. igf1 expression was increased by Gh in both gill and liver, and inhibited by cortisol in the liver. Gill igf1 and gh receptor expression increased in response to cortisol. Injection with Prl into SW salmon compromised their hypo-osmoregulatory performance, selectively reduced the expression of the α1b isoform and decreased enzymatic Na+,K+-atpase activity in the gill. Cortisol and Prl reduced gill and liver igf1 expression, and both hormones stimulated gill igf1 receptor expression. In a short-term experiment with incubation of FW gill cell suspensions, cortisol stimulated α1a and α1b expression, while Igf1 stimulated only α1b. The data elaborate our understanding of Prl and Gh as being antagonists in the control of gill ion regulation, and support a dual role for Gh involving endocrine and paracrine Igf1 action. Gh and Prl may be the decisive stimuli that direct cortisol-aided mitochondrion-rich cell development into either secretory or absorptive types.

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Yolanda Diz-Chaves, Manuel Gil-Lozano, Laura Toba, Juan Fandiño, Hugo Ogando, Lucas C González-Matías, and Federico Mallo

Diabetes mellitus exerts metabolic stress on cells and it provokes a chronic increase in the long-term activity of the hypothalamus–pituitary–adrenocortical (HPA) axis, perhaps thereby contributing to insulin resistance. GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists are pleiotropic hormones that not only affect glycaemic and metabolic control, but they also produce many other effects including activation of the HPA axis. In fact, several of the most relevant effects of GLP-1 might involve, at least in part, the modulation of the HPA axis. Thus, the anorectic activity of GLP-1 could be mediated by increasing CRF at the hypothalamic level, while its lipolytic effects could imply a local increase in glucocorticoids and glucocorticoid receptor (GC-R) expression in adipose tissue. Indeed, the potent activation of the HPA axis by GLP-1R agonists occurs within the range of therapeutic doses and with a short latency. Interestingly, the interactions of GLP-1 with the HPA axis may underlie most of the effects of GLP-1 on food intake control, glycaemic metabolism, adipose tissue biology and the responses to stress. Moreover, such activity has been observed in animal models (mice and rats), as well as in normal humans and in type I or type II diabetic patients. Accordingly, better understanding of how GLP-1R agonists modulate the activity of the HPA axis in diabetic subjects, especially obese individuals, will be crucial to design new and more efficient therapies for these patients.

Free access

E Zoidis, C Ghirlanda-Keller, M Gosteli-Peter, J Zapf, and C Schmid

In osteoblasts only the type III Na(+)-dependent phosphate (NaPi) transporter isoforms Pit-1 and Pit-2 have been identified. We tested the effects of extracellular Pi, Ca(2+) and IGF-I on Na(d)Pi transport and Pit-1 or Pit-2 mRNA expression in rat osteoblastic (PyMS) cells. The v(max) of Na(d)Pi transport was higher in cells kept in Pi-free, serum-free medium for 24 h than in controls at 1 mM Pi (2.47+/-0.20 vs 1.83+/-0.17 nmol/mg protein x 10 min). The apparent affinity constant (K(M)) for Pi remained unchanged. Pi withdrawal for 24 h did not impair cell viability whereas increasing the extracellular Pi to 5 mM resulted in cell death. Pit-1 (but not Pit-2) mRNA was upregulated following Pi deprivation, Ca(2+) treatment or after treatment with 1 nM IGF-I, known to stimulate Na(d)Pi transport and cell proliferation. IGF-I also stimulated Na(d)Pi transport and Pit-1 mRNA in primary rat calvarial osteoblasts. Expression of Pit-1 mRNA in vivo and the coordinate regulation of Pit-1 mRNA and Pi transport in osteoblastic cells suggest that Pit-1 is a candidate transporter of physiological relevance in bone.

Free access

Cathy A Guo and Shaodong Guo

The heart is an insulin-dependent and energy-consuming organ in which insulin and nutritional signaling integrates to the regulation of cardiac metabolism, growth and survival. Heart failure is highly associated with insulin resistance, and heart failure patients suffer from the cardiac energy deficiency and structural and functional dysfunction. Chronic pathological conditions, such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus, involve various mechanisms in promoting heart failure by remodeling metabolic pathways, modulating cardiac energetics and impairing cardiac contractility. Recent studies demonstrated that insulin receptor substrates 1 and 2 (IRS-1,-2) are major mediators of both insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) signaling responsible for myocardial energetics, structure, function and organismal survival. Importantly, the insulin receptor substrates (IRS) play an important role in the activation of the phosphatidylinositide-3-dependent kinase (PI-3K) that controls Akt and Foxo1 signaling cascade, regulating the mitochondrial function, cardiac energy metabolism and the renin–angiotensin system. Dysregulation of this branch in signaling cascades by insulin resistance in the heart through the endocrine system promotes heart failure, providing a novel mechanism for diabetic cardiomyopathy. Therefore, targeting this branch of IRS→PI-3K→Foxo1 signaling cascade and associated pathways may provide a fundamental strategy for the therapeutic and nutritional development in control of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we focus on insulin signaling and resistance in the heart and the role energetics play in cardiac metabolism, structure and function.

Free access

VA Gault, PR Flatt, P Harriott, MH Mooney, CJ Bailey, and FP O'Harte

The therapeutic potential of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) in improving glycaemic control in diabetes has been widely studied, but the potential beneficial effects of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) have until recently been almost overlooked. One of the major problems, however, in exploiting either GIP or GLP-1 as potential therapeutic agents is their short duration of action, due to enzymatic degradation in vivo by dipeptidylpeptidase IV (DPP IV). Therefore, this study examined the plasma stability, biological activity and antidiabetic potential of two novel NH2-terminal Ala2-substituted analogues of GIP, containing glycine (Gly) or serine (Ser). Following incubation in plasma, (Ser2)GIP had a reduced hydrolysis rate compared with native GIP, while (Gly2)GIP was completely stable. In Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts stably transfected with the human GIP receptor, GIP, (Gly2)GIP and (Ser2)GIP stimulated cAMP production with EC(50) values of 18.2, 14.9 and 15.0 nM respectively. In the pancreatic BRIN-BD11 beta-cell line, (Gly2)GIP and (Ser2)GIP (10(-8) M) evoked significant increases (1.2- and 1.5-fold respectively; P<0.01 to P<0.001) in insulinotropic activity compared with GIP. In obese diabetic ob/ob mice, both analogues significantly lowered (P<0.001) the glycaemic excursion in response to i.p. glucose. This enhanced glucose-lowering ability was coupled to a significantly raised (P<0.01) and more protracted insulin response compared with GIP. These data indicate that substitution of the penultimate Ala2 in GIP by Gly or Ser confers resistance to plasma DPP IV degradation, resulting in enhanced biological activity, therefore raising the possibility of their use in the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

Free access

Martina Bugáňová, Helena Pelantová, Martina Holubová, Blanka Šedivá, Lenka Maletínská, Blanka Železná, Jaroslav Kuneš, Petr Kačer, Marek Kuzma, and Martin Haluzík

Liraglutide is the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist widely used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Recently, it has been demonstrated to decrease cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes and high cardiovascular risk. Although the major modes of liraglutide action are well-known, its detailed action at the metabolic level has not been studied. To this end, we explored the effect of 2-week liraglutide treatment in C57BL/6 male mice with obesity and diabetes induced by 13 weeks of high-fat diet using NMR spectroscopy to capture the changes in urine metabolic profile induced by the therapy. The liraglutide treatment decreased body and fat pads weight along with blood glucose and triglyceride levels. NMR spectroscopy identified 11 metabolites significantly affected by liraglutide treatment as compared to high-fat diet-fed control group. These metabolites included ones involved in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide metabolism, β-oxidation of fatty acids and microbiome changes. Although majority of the metabolites changed after liraglutide treatment were similar as the ones previously identified after vildagliptin administration in a similar mouse model, the changes in creatinine, taurine and trigonelline were specific for liraglutide administration. The significance of these changes and its possible use in the personalization of antidiabetic therapy in humans requires further research.

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Haijiang Wu, Xinna Deng, Yonghong Shi, Ye Su, Jinying Wei, and Huijun Duan

Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a chronic disease characterized by glucose metabolic disturbance. A number of transcription factors and coactivators are involved in this process. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) is an important transcription coactivator regulating cellular energy metabolism. Accumulating evidence has indicated that PGC-1α is involved in the regulation of T2DM. Therefore, a better understanding of the roles of PGC-1α may shed light on more efficient therapeutic strategies. Here, we review the most recent progress on PGC-1α and discuss its regulatory network in major glucose metabolic tissues such as the liver, skeletal muscle, pancreas and kidney. The significant associations between PGC-1α polymorphisms and T2DM are also discussed in this review.

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A Amrani, M Jafarian-Tehrani, P Mormède, S Durant, J-M Pleau, F Haour, M Dardenne, and F Homo-Delarche

Abstract

Cytokines, particularly interleukin 1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor, are known to induce hypoglycemia in normal rodents or different experimental models of type II diabetes. We investigated, at the pre-diabetic stage, the effect of short-term administration of murine recombinant interleukin-1α (mrIL-1α) on the levels of glucose, insulin and corticosterone in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse, a spontaneous model of type I diabetes. Two-month-old, pre-diabetic NOD mice of both sexes were insensitive to mrIL-1α (12·5 and 50 μg/kg) 2 h after administration, the time at which the maximal decrease (around 50%) was observed in the C57BL/6 mouse strain. Kinetic studies however showed that mrIL-1α lowered glycemia in both sexes of NOD mice, but the effect was limited and delayed. In the NOD and C57BL/6 strains, mrIL-1α had no influence on insulin levels in females, but significantly increased them in males (P<0·0001). Castration of NOD males abrogated the stimulatory effect of mrIL-1α on insulin secretion. Corticosterone secretion was stimulated by mrIL-1α in both sexes of NOD and C57BL/6 mice, and this effect was faster and greater in NOD females than in C57BL/6 females. The incomplete hypoglycemic response to mrIL-1α in females may be attributed to the anti-insulin effect of glucocorticoids, an effect which can be demonstrated when mrIL-1α is administered to adrenalectomized animals or when mrIL-1α is administered together with the glucocorticoid antagonist RU38486. In NOD males, in contrast, glucocorticoids did not play a major role in the limited hypoglycemic response to mrIL-1α, since RU38486 and adrenalectomy were not able to unmask a hypoglycemic effect. Moreover, NOD mice of both sexes were less sensitive than C57BL/6 mice to the hypoglycemic effect of insulin (2·5 U/kg), which suggests some degree of insulin-resistance in NOD mice. With regard to the effect of IL-1 on NOD mouse glycemia, therefore, these results suggest that glucocorticoids and/or androgens, according to the animal's sex, may induce a state of insulin-resistance.

Journal of Endocrinology (1996) 148, 139–148