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Katherine N Balantekin Department of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, School of Public Health and Health Professions, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA
Center for Ingestive Behavior Research, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA

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Martin J Kretz Department of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, School of Public Health and Health Professions, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA

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Elizabeth G Mietlicki-Baase Department of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, School of Public Health and Health Professions, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA
Center for Ingestive Behavior Research, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA

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Binge eating is a central component of two clinical eating disorders: binge eating disorder and bulimia nervosa. However, the large treatment gap highlights the need to identify other strategies to decrease binge eating. Novel pharmacotherapies may be one such approach. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an intestinal and brain-derived neuroendocrine signal with a critical role in promoting glycemic control through its incretin effect. Additionally, the energy balance effects of GLP-1 are well-established; activation of the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) reduces food intake and body weight. Aligned with these beneficial metabolic effects, there are GLP-1R agonists that are currently used for the treatment of diabetes and obesity. A growing body of literature suggests that GLP-1 may also play an important role in binge eating. Dysregulation of the endogenous GLP-1 system is associated with binge eating in non-human animal models, and GLP-1R agonists may be a promising approach to suppress the overconsumption that occurs during binge eating. Here, we briefly discuss the role of GLP-1 in normal energy intake and reward and then review the emerging evidence suggesting that disruptions to GLP-1 signaling are associated with binge eating. We also consider the potential utility of GLP-1-based pharmacotherapies for reducing binge eating behavior.

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