Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 6 of 6 items for

  • Author: H Kishi x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

H Kishi, K Taya, G Watanabe and S Sasamoto

Abstract

Plasma and ovarian levels of inhibin were determined by a radioimmunoassay (RIA) at 3-h intervals throughout the 4-day oestrous cycle of hamsters. Plasma concentrations of FSH, LH, progesterone, testosterone and oestradiol-17β were also determined by RIAs. In addition, hamsters were injected at various times with human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) to determine the follicular development. The changes in plasma concentrations of FSH after injection of antisera to oestradiol-17β (oestradiol-AS) and inhibin (inhibin-AS) on the morning of day 2 (day 1=day of ovulation) were also determined.

Plasma concentrations of inhibin showed a marked increase on the afternoon of day 1, remained at plateau levels until the morning of day 4, then increased abruptly on the afternoon of day 4 when preovulatory LH and FSH surges were initiated. A marked decrease in plasma concentrations of inhibin occurred during the process of ovulation after the preovulatory gonadotrophin surges. An inverse relationship between plasma levels of FSH and inhibin was observed when the secondary surge of FSH was in progress during the periovulatory period. Plasma concentrations of oestradiol-17β showed three increase phases and these changes differed from those of inhibin. Changes in plasma concentrations of oestradiol-17β correlated well with the maturation and regression of large antral follicles. Follicles capable of ovulating following hCG administration were first noted at 2300 h on day 1. The number of follicles capable of ovulating reached a maximum on the morning of day 3 (24·8± 0·6), and decreased by 0500 h on day 4 (15·0 ± 1·1), corresponding to the number of normal spontaneous ovulations. Plasma concentrations of FSH were dramatically increased within 6 h after inhibin-AS, though no increase in FSH levels was observed after oestradiol-AS. These findings suggest that changes in the plasma levels of inhibin during the oestrous cycle provide a precise indicator of follicular recruitment, and that the changes in plasma concentrations of oestradiol-17β are associated with follicular maturation. These findings also suggest that inhibin may play a major role in the inhibition of FSH secretion during the oestrous cycle of the hamster.

Journal of Endocrinology (1995) 146, 169–176

Restricted access

H. Kaneko, Y. Nakanishi, K. Taya, H. Kishi, G. Watanabe, S. Sasamoto and Y. Hasegawa

ABSTRACT

To investigate the physiological importance of inhibin in the regulation of FSH secretion in cows, seven cyclic cows were treated with an inhibin antiserum raised against bovine 32 kDa inhibin in a castrated goat. The same animals treated with a castrated goat serum (control serum) served as controls. On day 12 of the oestrous cycle (day 0 = day of oestrus), four of seven cows were injected with 100 ml inhibin antiserum first, and the remaining three cows with 100 ml control serum first. Twelve days after the second oestrus following the first serum injection (42–46 days after the first serum injection), the former four cows were injected with control serum and the latter three with inhibin antiserum. Follicular development after the injections of control serum or inhibin antiserum was assessed by daily ultrasonographic examination.

Treatment with inhibin antiserum resulted in a marked increase (P < 0·01) in plasma concentrations of FSH and oestradiol-17β but not LH or progesterone, compared with those after treatment with control serum. Plasma concentrations of FSH increased significantly (P < 0·01) at 8 h after injection of antiinhibin serum when compared with the control value. Concentrations of FSH in the plasma remained high for 72 h, then declined to the control level by 84 h, concomitant with an abrupt decrease in the titre of free inhibin antibody in the plasma. High concentrations of oestradiol-17β were observed between 36 and 96 h after treatment. Treatment with inhibin antiserum markedly increased the number of small (≥ 4 < 7 mm in diameter), medium (≥ 7 < 10 mm) and large (≥ 10 mm) follicles by 48, 72 and 96 h after treatment when compared with the value before treatment. The number of large follicles returned to the pretreatment value at 168 h, whereas the number of small and medium follicles remained increased.

The present results provide strong evidence that inhibin is an important factor in the inhibitory regulation of FSH secretion during the mid-luteal phase of cows, and demonstrate that an increase in endogenous FSH secretion after immunoneutralization of circulating inhibin stimulates the rapid growth of a large number of follicles.

Journal of Endocrinology (1993) 136, 35–41

Free access

K Ohshima, H Kishi, M Itoh, G Watanabe, K Arai, K Uehara, NP Groome and K Taya

Plasma concentrations of inhibin pro-alphaC, inhibin A and inhibin B were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at 6 h intervals throughout the 4-day oestrous cycle of the golden hamster. Plasma concentrations of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and oestradiol-17beta were also measured by radioimmunoassay during the oestrous cycle. Plasma concentrations of inhibin A increased from the early morning of day 1 (day 1=day of ovulation) and reached plateau levels at 0500 h on day 2. An abrupt increase in plasma concentrations of inhibin A was found at 1700 h on day 4, when the preovulatory FSH surge was observed. An increase in plasma concentrations of inhibin B occurred on day 1 and reached plateau levels at 1700 h on day 1. The levels remained elevated until 0500 h on day 4 and declined gradually by 2300 h on day 4. Plasma concentrations of inhibin pro-alphaC gradually increased with some fluctuation from day 1 to 1700 h on day 4 and then declined. Significant negative relationships were noted between plasma FSH and both dimeric forms of inhibin from day 1 to day 3. Significant positive relationships were found between plasma oestradiol-17beta and inhibin A or inhibin pro-alphaC throughout the oestrous cycle. In contrast, no significant relationship was found between plasma oestradiol-17beta and inhibin B. These findings suggest that both dimeric forms of inhibin play a role in the regulation of FSH secretion during follicular development. These findings also suggest that inhibin pro-alphaC could be secreted primarily by large follicles, and early atretic follicles could also be responsible for inhibin pro-alphaC secretion. On the other hand, the secretory pattern of dimeric inhibins might shift from inhibin B to inhibin A with follicular development.

Restricted access

H Kishi, T Okada, M Otsuka, G Watanabe, K Taya and S Sasamoto

Abstract

The present study was conducted to study the effect of immunoneutralization against endogenous inhibin on FSH, LH, oestradiol-17β and progesterone secretion and to investigate the effect of removal of endogenous inhibin on subsequent follicular development in the hamster. After treatment with anti-inhibin serum (inhibin-AS) at 1100 h on day 2 of the oestrous cycle (day 1=day of ovulation), a marked increase in plasma levels of FSH and a slight increase in plasma levels of LH were noted and pituitary contents of FSH, but not LH, were also increased. In the group treated with inhibin-AS, superovulation occurred on day 1 of the following cycle. Plasma levels of oestradiol-17β markedly increased with the increase in the number of ovulations induced by human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) as compared with those in control animals. In the second cycle, plasma concentrations and pituitary contents of FSH in the animals given 200 μl inhibin-AS still showed high values as compared with those in the animals treated with control serum, although superovulation did not occur on day 1 of the third cycle. Plasma concentrations and pituitary contents of LH in the hamster given 200 μl inhibin-AS tended to decrease as compared with those in control animals during the second cycle. Plasma concentrations of oestradiol-17β in the animals treated with 200 μl inhibin-AS changed in a similar way to controls. A marked increase in plasma concentrations of progesterone was noted on days 1 and 2 of the second cycle in the group receiving inhibin-AS. The twice daily injection of 1 IU hCG during the second cycle to the animals given 200 μl inhibin-AS induced superovulation on day 1 of the third cycle.

These results indicate that circulating inhibin may be an important indicator of the number of developing follicles and may maintain the species-specific number of developing follicles through suppression of FSH secretion in the cyclic hamster. They also suggest that high levels of inhibin slightly suppress plasma levels of LH, indicating that plasma LH may also regulate follicular development in the cyclic hamster.

Journal of Endocrinology (1996) 151, 65–75

Free access

K Ohshima, H Kishi, M Itoh, KY Arai, G Watanabe, K Arai, K Uehara, NP Groome and K Taya

The changes in plasma concentrations of inhibins A, B and pro-alpha C were determined in the cyclic golden hamster during follicular atresia induced with antiserum against luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH-AS) at 1100 h on day 4 (day 1=day of ovulation). Follicular status in the ovary was also studied by determining the number of follicles ovulating in response to human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) injection. The time-courses of changes in plasma concentrations of inhibins A, B and pro-alpha C were different from each other during induced follicular atresia and subsequent follicular development. Plasma concentrations of inhibin A decreased to 58.6% of initial values by 24 h after LHRH-AS treatment, and then remained relatively low until at least 60 h later. Plasma concentrations of inhibin B decreased to 64.2% of the initial values by 18 h after LHRH-AS treatment and remained at basal values for 36 h, but increased abruptly to greater than initial values at 42 h after the treatment. Plasma concentrations of inhibin pro-alpha C increased at 6 and 12 h, decreased suddenly to 21.9% of the initial values by 24 h after LHRH-AS treatment, and then gradually increased until 60 h after LHRH-AS. The number of follicles responding to hCG decreased gradually between 0 and 30 h after LHRH-AS, when no ovulations were observed, and then gradually increased until 60 h. The changes in follicular ovulatory responses to hCG correlated with the plasma profile of inhibin A throughout the experiment. These results suggest that inhibin A is mainly secreted by large antral follicles. In contrast, during the subsequent follicular development, the plasma concentration of inhibin B increased earlier than that of inhibin A. These results suggest that inhibin B is secreted by small and large antral follicles. Plasma concentrations of inhibin pro-alpha C were high at a time when plasma concentrations of oestradiol-17 beta had already decreased, indicating that inhibin pro-alpha C is secreted not only from healthy follicles but also from early atretic antral follicles.

Free access

K Ohshima, K Ohshima, KY Arai, H Kishi, M Itoh, G Watanabe, PF Terranova, K Arai, K Uehara, NP Groome and K Taya

Numerous antral follicles develop during the second half of pregnancy in the golden hamster. However, mechanisms regulating follicular development during this period are unknown. Because inhibin and activin are related to follicular development, these hormones were studied to gain insight into any potential roles in follicular development. Plasma inhibin A and B suddenly increased from day 8 of pregnancy, reached peak levels on day 10 and gradually declined to term. Plasma activin A gradually increased from day 8 to day 15 of pregnancy, and this was followed by an abrupt decrease at day one of lactation. Ovariectomy on day 12 of pregnancy rapidly reduced plasma inhibin A and B, but not activin A levels. Hysterectomy or placentectomy on day 12 of pregnancy caused an abrupt decrease in the levels of plasma activin A and FSH, but not inhibin A and B at 6 h after surgery. Hysterectomy also induced atresia of large antral follicles at 24 h after surgery. These results indicate that antral follicles are the main source of circulating inhibin A and B, whereas uteri and placentae are the main source of circulating activin A. These results suggest that increased levels of activin A may be involved in folliculogenesis in the ovary during the second half of pregnancy in the golden hamster.