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Jung-Min Koh, Young-Sun Lee, Chang-Hyun Byun, Eun-Ju Chang, Hyunsoo Kim, Yong Hee Kim, Hong-Hee Kim and Ghi Su Kim

Growing evidence has shown a biochemical link between increased oxidative stress and reduced bone density. Although α-lipoic acid (α-LA) has been shown to act as a thiol antioxidant, its effect on bone cells has not been determined. Using proteomic analysis, we identified six differentially expressed proteins in the conditioned media of α-LA-treated human bone marrow stromal cell line (HS-5). One of these proteins, receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL), was significantly up-regulated, as confirmed by immunoblotting with anti-RANKL antibody. ELISA showed that α-LA stimulated RANKL production in cellular extracts (membranous RANKL) about 5-fold and in conditioned medium (soluble RANKL) about 23-fold, but had no effect on osteoprotegerin (OPG) secretion. Despite increasing the RANKL/OPG ratio, α-LA showed a dose-dependent suppression of osteoclastogenesis, both in a coculture system of mouse bone marrow cells and osteoblasts and in a mouse bone marrow cell culture system, and reduced bone resorption in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, α-LA-induced soluble RANKL was not inhibited by matrix metalloprotease inhibitors, indicating that soluble RANKL is produced by α-LA without any posttranslational processing. In contrast, α-LA had no significant effect on the proliferation and differentiation of HS-5 cells. These results suggest that α-LA suppresses osteoclastogenesis by directly inhibiting RANKL–RANK mediated signals, not by mediating cellular RANKL production. In addition, our findings indicate that α-LA-induced soluble RANKL is not produced by shedding of membranous RANKL.

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Eun Soo Lee, Mi-Hye Kwon, Hong Min Kim, Nami Kim, You Mi Kim, Hyeon Soo Kim, Eun Young Lee and Choon Hee Chung

Dibenzoylmethane (DBM) is a beta-diketone analog of curcumin. Numerous studies have shown the beneficial effects of curcumin on diabetes, obesity and diabetic complications including diabetic nephropathy. Recently, we investigated the beneficial metabolic effects of DBM on high-fat diet-induced obesity. However, the effects and mechanisms of action of DBM in the kidney are currently unknown. To investigate the renoprotective effects of DBM in type 2 diabetes, we administered DBM (100 mg/kg) orally for 12 weeks to high-fat diet-induced diabetic model mice. We used mouse renal mesangial (MES13) and macrophage (RAW 264.7) cells to examine the mechanism of action of DBM (20 μM). After DBM treatment, the albumin-to-creatinine ratio was significantly decreased compared to that of the high-fat-diet group. Moreover, damaged renal ultra-structures and functions including increased glomerular volume, glomerular basement membrane thickness and inflammatory signals were ameliorated after DBM treatment. Stimulation of MES13 and RAW264.7 cells by palmitate or high-dose glucose with lipopolysaccharides increased inflammatory signals and macrophage migration. However, these changes were reversed by DBM treatment. In addition, DBM inhibited NADPH oxidase 2 and 4 expression and oxidative DNA damage. Collectively, these data suggested that DBM prevented diabetes-induced renal injury through its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects.