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  • Author: Weiping Teng x
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Yuhui Liu, Le Zhang, Jing Li, Zhongyan Shan and Weiping Teng

Marginal iodine deficiency is a major health problem in pregnant women, but its impact on nerve and intelligence development in offspring has been rarely reported. Our study aimed to investigate the effects of maternal marginal iodine deficiency on nerve and cognitive development in offspring and the related mechanisms. Marginal iodine-deficient rats were given 3 μg iodine per day, while normal control rats were given 4 μg iodine daily. Western blot was used to detect the amounts of brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) and early growth response protein 1 (EGR1) in the hippocampus of each group. Immunohistochemistry was used to measure c-jun and c-fos expression in the hippocampal CA1 region. Finally, the water maze method was used to measure spatial performance. Free thyroxine (FT4) levels in marginal iodine-deficient rats decreased by about 30%. Seven days after birth, EGR1 and BDNF protein levels significantly decreased in the hippocampus of marginal iodine deficiency rats compared with the normal control group. In addition, c-jun and c-fos expression in the hippocampus of 40-day-old rats was decreased in marginal iodine-deficient rats, compared with control. The spatial learning and memory ability of 40-day-old marginal iodine-deficient rats had a downward trend compared with the normal control group. FT4 significantly decreased after pregnancy in rats with marginal iodine deficiency, affecting the expression of related proteins in the brain of offspring.

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Jiashu Yu, Zhongyan Shan, Wei Chong, Jinyuan Mao, Yuxiu Geng, Caixia Zhang, Qian Xing, Weiwei Wang, Ningna Li, Chenling Fan, Hong Wang, Hongmei Zhang and Weiping Teng

Acute and excessive iodine supplementation leads to iodine-induced thyroid cytotoxicity. Excessive oxidative stress has been suggested to be one of the underlying mechanisms in the development of thyroid cytotoxicity. The aim of this study was to investigate whether vitamin E (VE), an important antioxidant, could ameliorate iodine-induced thyroid cytotoxicity. A goiter was induced in rats by feeding a low-iodine (LI) diet for 12 weeks. Involution of hyperplasia was obtained by administering a twofold physiological dose of iodine in feeding water with/without the supplementation of 25-, 50-, or 100-fold physiological dose of VE in the LI diet for 4 weeks. In iodine-supplemented rats, thyroid epithelial cell ultrastructure injuries remained and were more severe. Relative weights of iodine-induced involuting glands were significantly reduced compared with the goiter, but still higher than control. Immunohistochemistry indicated that the expression of 4-hydroxynonenal, 8-hydroxyguanine, peroxiredoxin 5, and CD68 in thyroid increased (P<0.01), whereas thioredoxin reductase 1 decreased (P<0.01). VE supplementation attenuated thyroid cytotoxicity induced by iodine. A 50-fold VE dose was optimal in attenuating twofold iodine-induced thyroid cytotoxicity. However, VE supplementation did not reduce the weight or relative weight of the iodine-induced involuting gland. These results show that excess iodine leads to thyroid damage and VE supplementation can partly ameliorate iodine-induced thyroid cytotoxicity.