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Dan Li, Yan Ji, Chunlan Zhao, Yapeng Yao, Anlan Yang, Honghong Jin, Yang Chen, Mingjun San, Jing Zhang, Mingjiao Zhang, Luqing Zhang, Xuechao Feng and Yaowu Zheng

( Sympson et al. 1994 , Fata et al. 2001 , Ning et al. 2007 ). Oxytocin receptor (OXTR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor for neurotransmitter oxytocin ( Kimura et al. 1992 ). In response to ligand binding, activated OXTR couples to G αq/11 and G

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Jing Lu, Joshua Reese, Ying Zhou and Emmet Hirsch

1B (IL1B ( Il1B ), Mm00434228_m1), cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2 ( Ptgs2 ), Mm00478374_m1), iNOS ( Nos2 , Mm00440502_m1), oxytocin receptor ( Oxtr , Mm01182684_m1), Creb3 (Mm00457268_m1), and steroid receptor coactivator 2 (SRC2 ( Ncoa2 ), Mm00500749_m1

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Tatiane Vilhena-Franco, André Souza Mecawi, Lucila Leico Kagohara Elias and José Antunes-Rodrigues

Coen CW Petersen SL Liposits Z 2004 Estrogen receptor-beta in oxytocin and vasopressin neurons of the rat and human hypothalamus: immunocytochemical and in situ hybridization studies . Journal of Comparative Neurology 473 315 – 333

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Hiroki Otsubo, Susumu Hyodo, Hirofumi Hashimoto, Makoto Kawasaki, Hitoshi Suzuki, Takeshi Saito, Toyoaki Ohbuchi, Toru Yokoyama, Hiroaki Fujihara, Tetsuro Matsumoto, Yoshio Takei and Yoichi Ueta

vasopressin (AVP; Yokoi et al . 1996 ). Central administration of AM activated oxytocin (OXT)-secreting neurones in the supraoptic (SON) and the paraventricular nuclei (PVN; Serino et al . 1999 , Ueta et al . 2000 ), and markedly increased plasma OXT

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Bogdan A Danalache, Calvin Yu, Jolanta Gutkowska and Marek Jankowski

1) and OTR ( Fig. 1 B1) were predominantly expressed in the ventricular cells whereas ABCG2 protein signal ( Fig. 1 C1) was equally intense in the atrium as in the ventricles. Figure 1 Immunodetection of homeobox protein NKX-2.5, oxytocin receptor

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Riccardo Dore, Luka Levata, Hendrik Lehnert and Carla Schulz

axonal oxytocin release from magnocellular PVN and/or SON neurons was unaffected. The reduction of cumulative food intake induced by central nesfatin-1 was blocked by the coadministration of a selective antagonist for the oxytocin receptor (H4928

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Radmila Kancheva, Martin Hill, David Cibula, Helena Včeláková, Lyudmila Kancheva, Jana Vrbíková, Tomáš Fait, Antonín Pařízek and Luboslav Stárka

modulators of N -methyl- d -aspartate receptors (NMDA-R) respectively ( Park-Chung et al. 1997 , Weaver et al. 2000 ). The activation of NMDA-R in hypothalamic magnocellular neuroendocrine cells of the supraoptic nucleus may induce oxytocin production

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G E Mann, J H Payne and G E Lamming

Abstract

In intact cyclic ewes intrauterine infusion of conceptus secretory proteins results in the suppression of both endometrial oxytocin receptor concentrations and oxytocin-induced prostaglandin F release. However, similar infusion in progesterone-treated ovariectomized ewes, while suppressing endometrial oxytocin receptors, does not fully inhibit oxytocin-induced prostaglandin F release. To examine whether this anomaly resulted from an inadequate simulation of the luteal phase in the ovariectomized ewe treated with progesterone alone, the effects of additional treatment with two other ovarian hormones, oestradiol-17β and oxytocin, was investigated. Rather than permitting conceptus secretory protein to successfully inhibit oxytocin-induced prostaglandin F release, treatment with oestradiol-17β in addition to progesterone actually resulted in an advancement in the timing of release. However, treatment with oxytocin, alone or in combination with oestradiol, permitted the full inhibition of oxytocin-induced prostaglandin F release. To confirm that this effect did not result from the action of oxytocin alone, independently of the action of conceptus secretory protein, a second experiment was undertaken using a similar protocol but without the infusion of conceptus secretory protein. In this situation, oxytocin-induced prostaglandin F release was only partially inhibited suggesting that both luteal oxytocin and conceptus secretory proteins are necessary to facilitate the full inhibition of luteolysis during early pregnancy in the ewe.

Journal of Endocrinology (1996) 150, 473–478

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F S Khan-Dawood, J Yang, K Anwer and M Y Dawood

Abstract

Oxytocin has been identified in both non-human primate and human corpora lutea of the menstrual cycle by RIA, immunocytochemistry and HPLC. Evidence for the transcription of the oxytocin gene in this tissue using PCR is available. Oxytocin receptors have been characterized by biochemical procedures. However, there is some debate as to whether the oxytocin identified in these tissues is biologically active and has a role in luteal function. In this study we have demonstrated that oxytocin isolated by gel chromatography of tissue extracts from the baboon and the human corpus luteum is biologically active as determined in a rat uterine bioassay. Since both oxytocin and its receptors are present in these tissues, it is suggested that oxytocin in the human and non-human primate corpora lutea has a functional role.

Journal of Endocrinology (1995) 147, 525–532

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Hwa-Yong Lee, Tomas J Acosta, Michiyo Tanikawa, Ryosuke Sakumoto, Junichi Komiyama, Yukari Tasaki, Mariusz Piskula, Dariusz J Skarzynski, Masafumi Tetsuka and Kiyoshi Okuda

possible that the low PG production in the mid-luteal phase is due to other mechanisms, such as the down-regulation of oxytocin receptor by progesterone, the availability of arachidonic acid, or a decrease in the expression or activity of PGHS. Since PGF2α