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Motoyasu Satou, Yoshihiro Nishi, Akira Hishinuma, Hiroshi Hosoda, Kenji Kangawa and Hiroyuki Sugimoto

Introduction Ghrelin was first identified by Kojima et al . (1999) as an endogenous ligand for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor type 1a (GHSR1a, Howard et al . 1996 ) present in the rat stomach. This hormone is a 28-amino acid peptide

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Anneleen Segers, Louis Desmet, Shu Sun, Kristin Verbeke, Jan Tack and Inge Depoortere

Introduction Ghrelin, a 28-amino acid peptide, is the only known circulating hormone that stimulates food intake ( Kojima et al . 1999 ). Ghrelin is mainly produced in the stomach and is acylated by ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) on Ser 3

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T Takahashi, K Sato, S Kato, T Yonezawa, Y Kobayashi, Y Ohtani, S Ohwada, H Aso, T Yamaguchi, S G Roh and K Katoh

Introduction Ghrelin, an endogenous ligand for growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR), is produced primarily by the stomach ( Kojima et al . 1999 , Ariyasu et al . 2001 ) as well as the intestine, and then released into circulation. Ghrelin

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Hyunju Chung and Seungjoon Park

Introduction Ghrelin is a unique 28-amino acid peptide hormone mainly produced in the stomach. The peptide is known to act through the activation of the growth hormone (GH) secretagogue receptor 1a ( Kojima et al. 1999 ). Earlier studies

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Hyunju Chung, Endan Li, Yumi Kim, Sehee Kim and Seungjoon Park

Introduction Ghrelin, a 28-amino acid peptide hormone mainly produced in the stomach, has been shown to stimulate GH release by activating the GH secretagogue (GHS) receptor 1a (GHS-R1a; Kojima et al . 1999 ). Initial studies have shown that

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Farhana Naznin, Koji Toshinai, T M Zaved Waise, Cherl NamKoong, Abu Saleh Md Moin, Hideyuki Sakoda and Masamitsu Nakazato

, which are more optimally positioned to monitor bioactive substances released from gastrointestinal enteroendocrine cells. Nodose ganglion neurons are pseudounipolar neurons with two axons running towards the visceral organs and the NTS. Ghrelin, a

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Hiroharu Mifune, Yuji Tajiri, Yusuke Sakai, Yukie Kawahara, Kento Hara, Takahiro Sato, Yoshihiro Nishi, Akinori Nishi, Ryouichi Mitsuzono, Tatsuyuki Kakuma and Masayasu Kojima

producing the motivation to perform and adhere to exercise, especially in obese subjects. Ghrelin, which was originally identified as a growth hormone secretagogue (GHS), is an orexigenic gut hormone. This 28-amino acid peptide is produced by the X

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Harleen Kaur, Beverly S Muhlhausler, Pamela Su-Lin Sim, Amanda J Page, Hui Li, Maria Nunez-Salces, Georgia S Clarke, Lili Huang, Rebecca L Wilson, Johannes D Veldhuis, Chen Chen, Claire T Roberts and Kathryn L Gatford

responsible, either indirectly or directly, for driving the increased pituitary GH secretion during rodent pregnancy. Ghrelin, a gastric peptide hormone that acts in conjunction with hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) and somatostatin to

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Sabina Börner, Michael Derno, Sandra Hacke, Ulrike Kautzsch, Christine Schäff, Sint ThanThan, Hideto Kuwayama, Harald M Hammon, Monika Röntgen, Rosemarie Weikard, Christa Kühn, Armin Tuchscherer and Björn Kuhla

Introduction Ghrelin is a 28 amino acid peptide in monogastric species and a 27 amino acid peptide in ruminants ( Dickin et al . 2004 ). It is primarily produced by oxyntic cells in the stomach or abomasum respectively with smaller amounts produced

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Tetsuya Kouno, Nobuteru Akiyama, Takahito Ito, Tomohiko Okuda, Isamu Nanchi, Mitsuru Notoya, Shogo Oka and Hideo Yukioka

Introduction Ghrelin, a 28-amino-acid peptide hormone mainly produced by X/A-like cells of the stomach ( Date et al . 2000 ), was originally identified as an endogenous ligand of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor type 1a (GHS-R1a) ( Kojima