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Gina L C Yosten, Grant R Kolar, Lauren J Redlinger and Willis K Samson

containing 1, 10, or 100 nM siRNA directed against GPR107 ( Yosten et al . 2012 ), GPR146 ( Yosten et al . 2012 ), GPR160, or eGFP as a control ( Yosten et al . 2012 ), using Lipofectamine 2000 (Invitrogen), according to the manufacturer's instructions

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Terhi J Heino, Andrei S Chagin and Lars Sävendahl

-protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30) mRNA has been demonstrated to be expressed in several tissues, including central nervous system ( O'Dowd et al . 1998 , Brailoiu et al . 2007 ), liver ( Owman et al . 1996 , O'Dowd et al . 1998 ), and ovary ( Wang et al . 2007

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Georgina G J Hazell, Song T Yao, James A Roper, Eric R Prossnitz, Anne-Marie O'Carroll and Stephen J Lolait

-genomic’ effects e.g. activation of large conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (K ca 1.1; Valverde et al . 1999 ), and these could be mediated by extranuclear ERs or by non-classical membrane bound receptors ( Levin 2005 ). GPR30, a G protein

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Marcello Maggiolini and Didier Picard

Discovery and history of GPR30 In contrast to what some text books might have advocated, for a lot of hormones and receptors, there is no one-to-one relationship. The steroid hormone estrogen, represented by the most potent physiological estrogen 17

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Ya-Li Yang, Li-Rong Ren, Li-Feng Sun, Chen Huang, Tian-Xia Xiao, Bao-Bei Wang, Jie Chen, Brian A Zabel, Peigen Ren and Jian V Zhang

chemoattractant ligand of G protein-coupled receptors (GPRs), but was later found to be an adipocytokine that can regulate fat formation and adipocyte metabolism ( Bozaoglu et al . 2007 ). It is secreted from white adipocytes and widely expressed in multiple

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Eugen Brailoiu, Siok L Dun, G Cristina Brailoiu, Keisuke Mizuo, Larry A Sklar, Tudor I Oprea, Eric R Prossnitz and Nae J Dun

, Singh et al. 2000 , Toran-Allerand et al. 2002 , Morales et al. 2003 , Qiu et al. 2003 ). Two groups independently proposed that the G protein-coupled receptor (GPR 30), is the non-genomic ER ( Revankar et al. 2005

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Yu-Feng Zhao, Jianming Pei and Chen Chen

secretion, FFAs substantially decreases glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) under a long-term treatment condition ( Zraika et al . 2002 ). The discovery that FFAs activate the G-protein-coupled membrane receptor, GPR40, gives an explanation of how

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Marcello Canonaco, Giuseppina Giusi, Antonio Madeo, Rosa Maria Facciolo, Rosamaria Lappano, Alessia Canonaco and Marcello Maggiolini

non-genomic steroid action by the binding of 17β-estradiol (E 2 ) to a G-protein-coupled receptor 30 named GPR30. Although it is often straightforward to link the physiological effects of E 2 to a genomic model, considerable controversy still exists

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Perry Barrett, Elena Ivanova, E Scott Graham, Alexander W Ross, Dana Wilson, Helene Plé, Julian G Mercer, Francis J Ebling, Sandrine Schuhler, Sandrine M Dupré, Andrew Loudon and Peter J Morgan

indication of which cells in the ependymal layer express CRBPI. GPR50 is an orphan G-protein-coupled receptor with approximately 45% homology with melatonin receptors, but does not bind melatonin ( Reppert et al. 1996 , Drew et al. 1998 ). This

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Toni Welsh, Matrika Johnson, Lijuan Yi, Huiqing Tan, Roksana Rahman, Amy Merlino, Tamas Zakar and Sam Mesiano

GPR30 (alternatively known as G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER); Revankar et al . 2005 , Thomas et al . 2005 ). The purpose of this study was to determine whether these ERs are expressed in the pregnant human myometrium and to