C-type natriuretic peptide in reproduction, pregnancy and fetal development

in Journal of Endocrinology
Authors: T Walther and H Stepan
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C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) belongs to the natriuretic peptide family that consists of three structurally related peptides with a 17-amino acid ring linked by a disulfide bond. In contrast to atrial and brain natriuretic peptides that are mainly cardiovascular hormones, CNP acts predominantly in an autocrine/paracrine fashion, is commonly considered to be an endothelial hormone with antimitogenic properties, and is characterized as a regulator of endochondral ossification. Its biological effects are mediated by an intracellular cGMP accumulation via specific membrane-bound guanylyl cyclase B (GC-B) activation. There is growing evidence that this peptide is also involved in various reproductive processes as well as in embryonic and fetal development. In rodents, CNP and its receptor are highly expressed in the uterus and ovaries with specific regulation during the estrous cycle. During pregnancy, CNP mRNA is detectable in mice embryos and shows an organ-specific expression in maternal reproductive tIssues with the highest concentration in the placenta. This could indicate a defined biological function of the CNP/GC-B/cGMP axis in gestation e.g. antagonizing vasoconstrictive peptides like angiotensin II. In humans, besides a postulated fetal de novo synthesis of CNP, both the peptide and its receptor are expressed in the placenta and myometrium with opposite regulation of CNP in pregnancies complicated by pre-eclampsia or intrauterine growth retardation. Since the maternal plasma levels do not reflect these alterations, one can conclude that this part of the natriuretic peptide system acts locally suggesting that CNP-stimulated cGMP release exhibits organ-specific effects. Importantly, CNP has also become a peptide with a distinct role in male reproductive processes, since endocrine function of the testis and the regulation of penile erection are regulated by the CNP/GC-B axis. This review gives a comprehensive overview of the multiple functions of CNP in reproduction and pregnancy as well as in embryonic and fetal development.

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