THE POSSIBLE ROLE OF PROLACTIN IN THE REGULATION OF NESTING BEHAVIOUR AND THE SECRETION OF LUTEINIZING HORMONE IN BROODY BANTAMS

in Journal of Endocrinology
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The time spent each day on the nest and the rate of formation of the brood patch before the onset of incubation were measured in bantams (Gallus domesticus) and related to changes in the concentrations of plasma LH and prolactin. The hens spent progressively more time on the nest in the 5 days before the onset of incubation so that by the first day of incubation they were spending more than 90% of their time in this way. The concentration of plasma prolactin increased while that of LH fell on successive days before the onset of incubation: the increase in plasma prolactin preceded the fall in plasma LH by 2 days. The formation of the brood patch closely followed the increase in the concentration of plasma prolactin. In four out of five bantams the increase in nesting behaviour was preceded by an increase in the secretion of prolactin. An injection of chicken prolactin antiserum into bantams incubating eggs resulted in a significant (P<0·05) increase in the plasma concentration of LH.

These observations suggest that, in the bantam, the onset of incubation is initiated by an increase in the secretion of prolactin which also suppresses the secretion of LH.

 

      Society for Endocrinology

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